How bigotry distorts our thinking

Nasir Khan, January 10, 2015

If the Norwegian mass-murderer Anders Behring Breivik (for more on Breivik, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anders_Behring_Breivik) were a Muslim, then all Muslims would have been blamed for his crime and the lives of Muslim population of Norway made a living hell. (I live in Norway and I had seen how the Muslim people of Norway, including myself as a humanist and secularist [!], were blamed and treated in the wake of September 11, 2001 attacks in the United States of America. It was as if Muslims from Norway had attacked the Twin Towers in New York and they suddenly had to face the hatred, revulsion and hostility of so many native Norwegians against them.)

But Breivik was a white Norwegian, a white supremacist, an anti-Muslim ‘Knights Templar’ and a cold-blooded killer. Therefore no one ascribed his crime to the Norwegian people or to Christianity. That’s how we categorise ‘our terrorists’ and ‘their terrorists’ so differently. Such is the nature of bigotry that rules the passions of many people who have traditional ethno-religious blinkers.

————–
Muslim shooter = entire religion guilty
Black shooter = entire race guilty
White shooter = mentally troubled lone wolf
————-

Anders Behring Breivik (Norwegian pronunciation: [ˈɑnːəʂ ˈbeːrɪŋ ˈbrɛiviːk];[6] born 13 February 1979) is the perpetrator of the 2011 Norway attacks. On 22 July 2011, he bombed government buildings in Oslo, killing eight people. He then killed 69 more people, mostly teenagers, in a mass shooting at…
en.wikipedia.org

One Response to “How bigotry distorts our thinking”

  1. sudhan Says:

    Nasir Khan: There was an instructive and serious exchange of views on Pakistani Freethinkers, a Facebook group, between Mr Ghulam Rasool and me on some matters of common concern to us. I reproduce the exchange for wider publicity among our readers because of the importance of the issues we discuss. What Mr Rasool says is substantial, vital and realistic. I know many people will rather avoid to see or digest such views. But it goes to his credit to be forthcoming in his critique of the behaviour of the Muslim communities in Europe, which in itself is a healthy sign. But if anyone’s ‘religious feelings’ get hurt by the social reality that surrounds us, then let it be. Neither Mr Rasool, nor I mince our words!
    ————-

    Ghulam Rasool: Breivik killed because he felt that his country is being occupied by Muslims. And if you watch in your city or any other European capital, you would have the same feeling. Mosques are mushrooming in every city, burqas, hijab are all around. Muslims do not believe in integrating in the local societies, they would rather like the host society ,to change itself to fit Muslims needs. Another major difference between Muslims and the host society is that when some crime is committed, they condemn it and show their disapproval, while Muslims only demonstrate when their is film or cartoons about Muhammad. Can you tell me how many demonstrations were organized by Muslims in Oslo or any other European capital against 9/11. How many Muslims you can find who believe that blasphemer should not be killed. It is true that not all Muslims kill for blasphemy but every Muslim believe that a blasphemer should be killed. Muslims should try to show that they are member of the local societies and not some imaginary Ummah. They should earn respect rather than accusing other for racism and Islamlophobia because these tactics are not going to work anymore.

    Nasir Khan: Ghulam Rasool, there are a number of issues you refer to critically and quite rightly so. The problems facing the Muslim people around the world whether they live in their old countries or live in Europe, North America or Australia, or the problems they have created wherever they are or wherever they go are because of the cultural baggage they carry in which their religion happens to totalise and dominate their consciousness. In my view, this is something that’s not going to change now or in the foreseeable future. The undercurrent of the whole phenomenon is attributable to ignorance and indoctrination by the clerics, which has taken deep roots in Pakistan. Here also comes the role of politicians who have used Islam mercilessly for their ends and pushed the people on a vast scale in the abysmal ditches of ignorance. In my country of origin, Pakistan, I see only the dark clouds of ignorance hovering everywhere in the name of a religion that do not and will not let any ray of light, the light of reason to penetrate. In my articles and comments I have tried to highlight these issues as much as possible. Luckily some other activists are also doing a constructive work in these areas. That gives us some hope.2 hrs · Like

    Ghulam Rasool: I think this is the duty of enlightened people like you to educate these cattle that they should keep their religion inside mosques rather dreaming about islamizing every country. They should rather try to be part of the society they live in. The dark forces of seventh forces want these Muslims to collide with the indigenous population, where Muslims have nothing but to loose.

    Nasir Khan: Such work can be done only collectively by the people who realise the gravity of the situation for the host societies as well as for the new generations of Muslims in these societies. Many Islamic countries, such as Pakistan, are in a hopeless mess and they export the same what they produce – mullahs and the ‘real Islam’. As a result these migrant Muslims are busy producing mental and social ghettoes in democratic societies of Europe and North America. In a positive way, we have to show the dangers they have created by their narrow outlook. As we understand our Muslim people and the problems they have created, we have a role to advance new ideas and fight against traditional ways and thinking of these people.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: